Jim Miller on Politics

Last updated:
12:29 PM, 16 November 2018



Jim Miller on Politics

  Email:
jimxc1 at gmail.com



What's he reading? Francis Parkman.

News Compilers
(Why These?)

A&L Daily
Drudge
Hot Air
Jewish World Review
Lucianne
Mediaite
memeorandum
*newser
Orbusmax
Rantburg
Real Clear Politics
SciTech Daily
Yahoo


Big Media
(Why These?)

Atlantic Monthly
Axios
BBC
CNN
Chosen Ilbo
Daily Mail (UK)
Deutsche Welle
Fox News
Globe and Mail (CA)
Guardian (UK)
Investor's Business Daily
Le Figaro (FR)
Le Monde (FR)
The Local (Sweden)
National Review
New York Times
The New Yorker
Politico
Seattle PI
Seattle Times
Slate
Slashdot
The Spectator (UK)
Der Spiegel
Telegraph (UK)
Times (UK)
U. S. News
USA Today
Wall Street Journal
Washington Examiner
Washington Post
Washington Times


References:

Adherents
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Census Quick Facts
Dave Leip's Election Atlas
FactCheck
Federal Statistics
How Stuff Works
NationMaster
Refdesk
Snopes
StateMaster
Tax Facts
Unionstats
Wikipedia


Smart Media
(Why These?)

*The American
The American Spectator
Michael Barone
City Journal
Commentary
FiveThirtyEight
Front Page Magazine
Michael Fumento
The Hill
Media Research
Michael Medved
New York Sun
Number Watch
PJ Media
Public Interest
Roll Call
Spinsanity
Townhall
The Weekly Standard


Blogs
(Why These?)

My Group Blog:
Sound Politics

Northwest:


Economic Freedom
Orcinus
Public Interest Transportation Forum
<pudge/*>
Northwest Progressive Institute
Seattle Bubble


Other US:


Ace of Spades HQ
Ann Althouse
American Thinker
Art Contrarian
Balloon Juice
Baseball Crank
Beldar
Bookworm Room
Chicago Boyz
Classical Values
*College Insurrection
Daily Pundit
Discriminations
Econlog
Election Law
Fausta
Flares into Darkness
Flopping Aces
The Long War Journal
Keith Hennessey
Hugh Hewitt
Instapundit
Joanne Jacobs
Jeff Jarvis
The Jawa Report
Brothers Judd
JustOneMinute
Kausfiles
Kesher Talk
Le-gal In-sur-rec-tion
Little Green Footballs
Megan McArdle
Michelle Malkin
Greg Mankiw
Marginal Revolution
Mazurland
Minding the Campus
The ModerateVoice
*The Monkey Cage Mudville Gazette
"neo-neocon"
Betsy Newmark
Newsbusters
No Watermelons Allowed
Parapundit
"Patterico"
Daniel Pipes
Polipundit
Political Arithmetik
Political Calculations
Power Line
QandO
Right Wing News
Scrappleface
Screw Loose Change
Sense of Events
Joshua Sharf
Rand Simberg
Smart Politics
The Spirit of Enterprise
*Strange Maps
The Strata-Sphere
Sweetness & Light
TalkLeft
Talking Points Memo
TaxProf
VDH's Private Papers
Volokh Conspiracy
Washington Monthly
Wizbang
Matt Welch
Winds of Change
Meryl Yourish
*Zip Dialog
zombietime


Canadians:


BlazingCatFur
Five Feet of Fury
Kate McMillan
Damian Penny
Bruce Rolston


Latin America:


Babalú
Caracas Chronicles
The Devil's Excrement
Venezuela News and Views


Overseas:


Bruce Bawer
Biased BBC
Tim Blair
*Andrew Bolt
Brussels Journal
*The Conservative Woman
Crooked Timber
Davids Medienkritik
Egyptian Sand Monkey
EU Referendum
Guido Fawkes
Harry's Place
Mick Hartley
Oliver Kamm
JG, Caesarea
¡No-Pasarán!
Political Betting
John Ray
samizdata
Shark Blog
Natalie Solent
Laban Tall
*David Thompson
Michael Yon

Science Blogs:
The Blackboard
Cliff Mass Weather
Climate Audit
Climate Depot
Climate Science
*Judith Curry
Future Pundit
Gene Expression
The Loom
In The Pipeline
Roger Pielke Jr.
Real Climate
A Voyage To Arcturus
Watts Up With That?

Media Blogs:
My Northwest

R-Rated:
Horse's A**
Huffington Post

Emeritus:
Alien Corn
Dr. Sanity
Villainous Company
*new



Pseudo-Random Thoughts

This Andy Marlette Cartoon may be a little over the top for some — but I like the Simpsons reference.

(Some will prefer this Disney reference in another Marlette cartoon.).
- 3:43 PM, 17 November 2018   [link]


The Permanent Presidency Is Attacking Chinese Economic Espionage:  Overtly, says David Ignatius.
While the bombastic U.S.-China “trade war” has been getting the headlines, U.S. intelligence and law enforcement agencies have been waging a quieter battle to combat Chinese theft of trade secrets from American companies — a practice so widespread that even boosters of trade with China regard it as egregious.

The indictments don’t just charge violations of law; they also expose details of Chinese spycraft.  And there’s a hidden threat:  The Chinese must consider whether the United States has blown the covers of not just the people and organizations named in the criminal charges but also others with whom they came in contact.
We have been slow to react to these Chinese thefts, despite their scale, and their effects on our companies.  I have seen an estimate — which I can't verify for obvious reasons — that the Chinese have stolen $1 trillion dollars worth of our secrets.

In 2015, the Chinese regime promised to stop these thefts.  They have't kept that promise, either.

(David Ignatius)
- 12:29 PM, 16 November 2018   [link]


This Woman is trying to be fair.
- 10:17 AM, 16 November 2018   [link]


Two Bittman Slow Cooker Recipes, With Notes:   I've been using these recipes for years, with good to excellent results:

PASTA WITH TOMATO SAUCE AND RIBS

Time: At least 4 hours

6 to 8 meaty spareribs, about 1 1/2 to 2 pounds
6 cloves garlic, peeled and lightly crushed
1 dried chili, or to taste
Salt and pepper to taste
1 28-ounce can plum tomatoes, chopped
1 pound penne or other cut pasta
Chopped fresh parsley for garnish.

1. If you like, brown ribs in a skillet before adding them to pot. Combine all ingredients except pasta and garnish in slow cooker.  Cover and cook until meat is very tender, 4 hours or more on high heat, 6 hours or more on low.

2. Bring a pot of water to a boil and salt it.  Cook pasta until tender but not mushy.  Serve pasta with a rib or two, and a few spoonfuls of sauce, garnished with parsley.

Yield: 4 servings.

Notes:

1. I almost always use country ribs, because they are cheaper.  I cut them up in chunks, two to four inches wide, before putting them in the slow cooker.
2. Crushed tomatoes are easier to find and, as far as I can tell, work just as well.
3. I slice the garlic cloves, so I don’t eat one whole.
4. The bigger the chili, the more spicy.  I usually use one a little more than an inch long.
5. It would probably shock Mark Bittman, but I like to use Parmesan cheese out of a shaker for garnish, instead of parsley.
6. I add salt just before I eat it, and have never found any reason to add pepper.
7. The dish freezes nicely, so I always make extra.



SHORT RIBS WITH CHINESE FLAVORS

Time: At least 5 hours

8 short ribs, about 3 pounds
1/2 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup sugar or honey
3 star anise
6 scallions, trimmed
1 3-inch piece cinnamon
5 nickel-size slices of ginger
1 teaspoon Sichuan peppercorns
Salt
Cooked white rice for serving
Chopped scallions or fresh cilantro leaves for garnish.

1. Combine all ingredients, except salt, rice and garnish, in slow cooker.   Cover and cook until meat is very tender and falling from bone, 5 hours or more on high, 7 hours or more on low.  Taste and add salt if necessary.

2. If you like, remove meat, strain liquid and refrigerate meat and liquid separately; skim fat from liquid, and reheat with meat.  Serve hot over white rice garnished with scallions or cilantro.

Yield: 4 servings.

Notes:
1. When I first decided to make this dish, I had trouble finding the peppercorns, and ended up ordering them from Amazon.
2. Short ribs do go on sale, occasionally.
3. I have never found any reason to use salt.
4. Because the peppercorns are hard to spot, I wrap them in a small piece of cheesecloth.   A real cook would probably think of a better solution.
5. I sometimes serve them with slices of French bread, instead of rice.
6. This dish also freezes nicely.

As you probably noticed, Bittman, as a pro, cares way more about presentation than I do.

If this old link still works, here's the original article, which includes a third recipe, for the ambitious.

(I saw no way to include my notes and have them make sense, without quoting extensively from the article.)
- 8:02 PM, 15 November 2018   [link]


Japan And Russia May Finally Sign A Peace Treaty Ending World War II:  Let me repeat, may.
Russian President Vladimir Putin said Thursday the sovereignty of two islands that would be transferred to Japan on the conclusion of a peace treaty is subject to future negotiations.

A day after holding talks with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Singapore, Putin noted that a 1956 joint declaration, which will serve as the basis for the forthcoming talks, does not specify the islands' sovereignty.
. . .
Putin has acknowledged the legal validity of the declaration.  But his remarks indicate it will not be easy for Japan to realize the return of Shikotan and the Habomai islet group as stated in the document, even though Abe has apparently altered Tokyo's approach to the territorial issue to one that focuses on first regaining control over them and agreed to step up talks on the treaty.
Japan calls the islands the "Northern Territories"; Americans usually refer to them as part of the Kuril island chain.

Pure speculation:  When I first heard about this on NHK World, I wondered why Abe was raising the issue, now.

I suspect that he sees the United States as a less reliable ally, and is seeking to reduce tensions with all his neighbors.  I believe he is offering to give up claims to other islands in the chain, but could be wrong about that.
- 3:14 PM, 15 November 2018   [link]


"Timely Reminder: Recounts Are 3-23 In Past Two Decades"  From the Miami Herald by way of Hot Air.
But a recount that reverses an initial margin of more than a few hundred votes would be unprecedented in the recent history of American elections.   According to an analysis by the nonpartisan group FairVote, which advocates for electoral reforms that make it easier to vote, out of 4,687 statewide elections between 2000 and 2016, just 26 went to a recount.  Of those 26, just three recounts wound up changing the initial result of the race:  The 2004 Washington governor’s race, the 2006 Vermont state auditor’s race and the 2008 Minnesota U.S. Senate race.  The average swing in those three elections after the recounts? About 311 votes.
So the recounts in Florida are unlikely to change the results of the senate and governor races.

This is not as reassuring as it may seem.  Republicans — but very few Democrats — know that illegal votes almost cost George W. Bush Florida in 2000.  Washington state Republicans — but very few Democrats — know that Christine Gregoire would have lost the 2004 election if only legal votes had been counted.  And Minnesota Republicans appear to feel the same way about the 2008 election.
- 1:59 PM, 15 November 2018   [link]


Too Funny not to share.
- 9:35 AM, 15 November 2018   [link]


This Cartoon Gives Some Insight into the thinking of an often misunderstood minority — young men.

(Xkcd)
- 9:07 AM, 15 November 2018   [link]


Intense Minorities And Gun Control, Again:  Last Friday, KUOW's Gang of Four was discussing the easy passage (60-40) of gun control initiative I-1639, and wondering why similar measures have not passed the Washington state legislature.

The main reason for these different results is fairly simple:  Gun rights advocates are an "intense minority"; they may even be "single-issue" voters.  Legislators, knowing this, realize they will lose more votes taking a stand against the National Rifle Association than they gain.

But with initiatives, intensity matters far less, assuming candidates and other issues motivate people to fill out their ballots.

I was genuinely surprised that no one in the Gang appeared to know this; it is not an obscure concept.

(There is a secondary reason for the difference between legislative and initiative results:  Gun control advocates tend to be concentrated in urban districts, which means they influence fewer legislators than they would if they were more spread out.

You can find two earlier posts on intense minorities here and here.)
- 4:17 PM, 13 November 2018   [link]


The Current "Pepper . . . And Salt" made me chuckle.
- 9:47 AM, 13 November 2018   [link]


How Bad Are Our Long-Term Budget Problems?  This bad
The Congressional Budget Office estimates interest spending will rise to $915 billion by 2028, or 13% of all outlays and 3.1% of gross domestic product.
The outlook would be better if Nancy Pelosi had not blocked George W. Bush's proposals for entitlement reform after the 2004 election.  The outlook would be even worse if John Boehner had not slowed spending growth after the 2010 election.

I see no solution to this problem that does not include higher taxes in the years to come.

(United States federal budget)
- 4:08 PM, 12 November 2018   [link]


We're Still Counting Votes, but I think we can already say that this Rasmussen poll looks foolish.

(And the CNN poll doesn't look very good, either.)

But that won't stop Drudge from linking to Rasmussen.
- 10:28 AM, 12 November 2018   [link]


- 9:31 AM, 12 November 2018   [link]


Armistice Day:  On the 11th hour, of the 11th day, of the 11th month of 1918, an armistice ended the fighting in World War I.  (Though not without difficulty.   Some American troops, having spare shells and wanting the glory of having the last shot, competed with each other, for a time, after the official end.)

For many European countries, the war was a disaster from which they have never completely recovered.  The casualties they suffered were so immense that, even now, they astonish.  They were so large that, from the very beginning, the combatants lied about them on a grand scale, and even now historians argue about the numbers, especially the numbers in eastern Europe.  This Wikipedia article gives some of the common estimates of the casualties.  The almost 1.4 million French military dead are more than all the deaths the United States has suffered in all our wars, combined.  More than 1 million of them were from France itself, with the rest coming mostly from the French colonies.  Since France then had a population of about 40 million, more than 1 in 40 died in the war; for us, now, the equivalent loss would be about 8 million deaths.

After World War II, we renamed Armistice Day to Veterans Day, to honor the soldiers of all our wars.  When we honor, as we should, especially today, the American soldiers who served, and sometimes died in our wars, we should also spare some thought for those who fought at our side and who suffered far more than we did.

(This is an edited version of a post I first put up in 2002.)
- 11:00 AM, 11 November 2018   [link]


Archives

June 2002
July 2002
August 2002
September 2002
October 2002, Part 1 and Part 2
November 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
December 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3

January 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
February 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
March 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
April 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2004, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2004, Part 1, Part 2. Part 3, and Part 4
October 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2005, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2006, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2007, Part 1 Part 2, and Part 3, and Part 4
June 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2008, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4
May 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3. and Part 4

January 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2012, Part 1, Part 2 Part 3, and Part 4
August 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3and Part 4
December 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2013, , Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4
March 2014, Part 1. Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2015, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2015, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2017, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
April 2017, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2018, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2018, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2018, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2018, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2018, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2018, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2018, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2018, Part 1 and Part 2
September 2018, Part 3 and Part 4
October 2018, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4
November 2018, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3






Coming Soon
  • Plan 17 Conservatives
  • FDR and Waterboarding
  • Carbon, Carbon Dioxide, and Crescent Wrenches


Coming Eventually
  • JFK and Wiretaps
  • Green Republicans
  • The Rise and Fall and Rise of Black Voting
  • Abortion, Cleft Palates, and Europe
  • Kweisi Mfume's Children
  • Public Opinion During Other US Wars
  • Dual Loyalties
  • The Power Index
  • Baby Dancing
  • Jocks, but no Nerds
  • The Four Caliphs




Best Posts


Books


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The Unknown Bush


University Reform


Uncorrected Mistakes


Vote Fraud


The Gang of Four


Articles


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(What's This?)


Columns


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(What's This?)


Chomsky Cult Program


*new