Last updated:
4:01 PM, 8 December 2016



Jim Miller on Politics

  Email:
jimxc1 at gmail.com



What's he reading? Francis Parkman.

News Compilers
(Why These?)

A&L Daily
Drudge
Hot Air
Jewish World Review
Lexis-Nexis
Lucianne
Mediaite
memeorandum
Monsters and Critics
*newser
Orbusmax
Rantburg
Real Clear Politics
SciTech Daily
Yahoo


Big Media
(Why These?)

Atlantic Monthly
BBC
CNN
Chosen Ilbo
*Daily Mail (UK)
*Deutsche Welle
Fox News
Globe and Mail (CA)
Guardian (UK)
Investor's Business Daily
Le Figaro (FR)
Le Monde (FR)
The Local (Sweden)
National Review
New York Times
The New Yorker
Politico
Seattle PI
Seattle Times
Slate
Slashdot
The Spectator (UK)
Der Spiegel
Telegraph (UK)
Times (UK)
El Universal
U. S. News
USA Today
Wall Street Journal
Washington Examiner
Washington Post
Washington Times


References:

Adherents
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Census Quick Facts
Dave Leip's Election Atlas
FactCheck
Federal Statistics
How Stuff Works
NationMaster
Refdesk
Snopes
StateMaster
Tax Facts
Unionstats
Wikipedia


Smart Media
(Why These?)

ABC News Note
*The American
The American Spectator
Michael Barone
City Journal
Commentary
Front Page Magazine
Michael Fumento
The Hill
Media Research
Michael Medved
New York Sun
Number Watch
PJ Media
Public Interest
Roll Call
Spinsanity
Townhall
The Weekly Standard


Blogs
(Why These?)

My Group Blog:
Sound Politics

Northwest:


The American Empire
AndrewsDad
Chief Brief
Clear Fog Blog
Coffeemonkey's weblog
Croker Sack
"DANEgerus"
Economic Freedom
Federal Way Conservative
Freedom Foundation
Hairy Thoughts
Huckleberry Online
Andy MacDonald
NW Republican
Orcinus
Public Interest Transportation Forum
<pudge/*>
Northwest Progressive Institute
*Progressive Majority
Matt Rosenberg
Seattle Blogger
Seattle Bubble
Washington Policy Center
West Sound Politics
Zero Base Thinking


Other US:


Ace of Spades HQ
Alien Corn
Ann Althouse
American Thinker
The Anchoress
Armies of Liberation
Art Contrarian
"Baldilocks"
Balloon Juice
Baseball Crank
La Shawn Barber
Beldar
Bleat
Bookworm Room
Broadband Politics
Stuart Buck
Keith Burgess-Jackson
*Bush Center
Chef Mojo
Chicago Boyz
Classical Values
*College Insurrection
Confederate Yankee
Jules Crittenden
Daily Pundit
Discriminations
Gregory Djerejian
Daniel W. Drezner
Econlog
Econopundit
Election Law
John Ellis
Engage
Dean Esmay
Gary Farber
Fausta
FiveThirtyEight
Flares into Darkness
Flopping Aces
The Long War Journal
Gateway Pundit
Grasping Reality With Both Hands
Keith Hennessey
Hugh Hewitt
Siflay Hraka
Instapundit
Iowahawk
Joanne Jacobs
Jeff Jarvis
The Jawa Report
Brothers Judd
JustOneMinute
Kausfiles
Kesher Talk
Le-gal In-sur-rec-tion
Little Green Footballs
Megan McArdle
Michelle Malkin
Greg Mankiw
Marginal Revolution
Mazurland
Minding the Campus
The ModerateVoice
*The Monkey Cage Mudville Gazette
"neo-neocon"
Betsy Newmark
Newsbusters
No Watermelons Allowed
Ambra Nykola
*The Optimistic Conservative
The Ornery American
OxBlog
Parapundit
"Patterico"
Daniel Pipes
Polipundit
Political Arithmetik
Political Calculations
Pollster.com
Power and Control
Power Line
Protein Wisdom
QandO
Radio Equalizer
RedState
Riehl World View
Right Wing News
Rightwing Nuthouse
Dr. Sanity
Scrappleface
Screw Loose Change
Linda Seebach
Sense of Events
Joshua Sharf
Rand Simberg
Smart Politics
The Spirit of Enterprise
Stability For Our Time
*Strange Maps
The Strata-Sphere
Andrew Sullivan
Don Surber
Sweetness & Light
Taking Hayek Seriously
TalkLeft
Talking Points Memo
TaxProf
USS Neverdock
VDH's Private Papers
Verum Serum
Villainous Company
Volokh Conspiracy
Washington Monthly
Wizbang
Dr. Weevil
Matt Welch
Winds of Change
Meryl Yourish
zombietime


Canadians:


BlazingCatFur
Colby Cosh
Five Feet of Fury
Kate McMillan
Damian Penny
Bruce Rolston


Latin America:


Babalú
Caracas Chronicles
The Devil's Excrement
Venezuela News and Views


Overseas:


"Franco Aleman"
Bruce Bawer
Biased BBC
Tim Blair
*Andrew Bolt
Peter Briffa
Brussels Journal
Butterflies and Wheels
Crooked Timber
Davids Medienkritik
Egyptian Sand Monkey
EU Referendum
Greenie Watch
Guido Fawkes
Harry's Place
Mick Hartley
Oliver Kamm
JG, Caesarea
*Le Monde Watch
¡No-Pasarán!
Fredrik Norman
Melanie Phillips
*Political Betting
John Ray
samizdata
Shark Blog
Natalie Solent
Somtow's World
Bjørn Stærk
Laban Tall
*David Thompson
Michael Yon

Science Blogs:
The Blackboard
Cliff Mass Weather
Climate Audit
Climate Depot
Climate Science
*Judith Curry
Future Pundit
Gene Expression
The Loom
In The Pipeline
Roger Pielke Jr.
Real Climate
A Voyage To Arcturus
Watts Up With That?

Media Blogs:
Andrew Malcolm
Dori Monson
David Postman
Rhetorical Ammo
Tierney Lab
*White House Dossier

R-Rated:
Horse's A**
Huffington Post

*new



Pseudo-Random Thoughts

"The Revenge Of Analog"  That's an intriguing title for a book and, judging only by this Michiko Kakutani review, it may be a book worth reading.
In his captivating new book, “The Revenge of Analog,” the reporter David Sax provides an insightful and entertaining account of this phenomenon, creating a powerful counternarrative to the techno-utopian belief that we would live in an ever-improving, all-digital world.  Mr. Sax argues that analog isn’t going anywhere, but is experiencing a bracing revival that is not just a case of nostalgia or hipster street cred, but something more complex.

“Analog experiences can provide us with the kind of real-world pleasures and rewards digital ones cannot,” he writes, and “sometimes analog simply outperforms digital as the best solution.”
(I usually skim the "Arts" section of the Times, but I sometimes find something in it worth more than a few seconds of my time.)
- 4:01 PM, 8 December 2016   [link]


Paul Ryan's Big Win:  In spite of the drag of Donald Trump on the Republican Party, Paul Ryan scored an impressive win in November's election.

There are still a few votes to be counted, most of them in California and the two Louisiana districts where they are having run-offs this Saturday, but the total popular vote for Republican House candidates is already at almost 61.5 million, easily a record.   Republicans won a solid, 2.6 percent margin in the total popular vote —while Trump was losing by about 2 percent.

That 2.6 percent margin may not seem impressive, but given the Trump drag, the relative stability of the popular vote in recent elections, and the Republican advantage in districting (some of it natural, some of it from gerrymandering), it is.

Like me, you may find the comparisons to two previous presidential years, 2012 and 2004, instructive.  You'll notice, for instance, that the Democrats under Nancy Pelosi, had more than a million votes fewer this year, than in 2012, in spite of the growth in the electorate.

(The map I used two days ago came from the 2016 article, as I should have mentioned in the earlier post.  The article is detailed enough so that it may answer questions you may have about the map.  For example, that rural district on the west side of Minnesota, Minnesota 7th, looks as if it should be Republican.  And it does lean Republican, but it is held by Collin Peterson, a moderate Democrat, who first won the district (on his fourth try!) in 1990.)
- 3:16 PM, 8 December 2016   [link]


Should There Be A Medal for this?

Perhaps.
- 9:12 AM, 8 December 2016   [link]


75 Years After Pearl Harbor:   This year, as I have before, I will recycle three of my four posts from 2011: the complete failure of the first phase of the Japanese attack, why we were surprised, and Roosevelt's "day of infamy" speech.

(I particularly recommend the surprise post, since I think it has relevance today.)

This year, as usual, Bing has an appropriate picture; this year, for a change, Google is remembering the day — barely.
- 10:04 AM, 7 December 2016   [link]


Republican Rural Dominance:  You can see it clearly in this map of the House seats each party won in November's election.

Map of House election results, 2016

(Red districts are Republican holds, orange, Republican gains, dark blue, Democratic holds, and light blue, Democratic gains.  The two districts in Louisiana (3rd and 4th), where they are holding run-offs this Saturday, are heavily Republican, and almost certain to be Republican holds.

I expect the map to change after the final results come in.)

About 19 percent of Americans live in rural areas, so the population of rural America is about the same size as that of Britain or France.

As far as I can tell, urban Democrats, elected officials and "mainstream" journalists alike, see no reason to change in order to compete in the rural areas, or even to ask why they are so unpopular outside the big cities.

For example, in Washington state, rural Grays Harbor County voted for a Republican presidential candidate for the first time since 1928.  And Washington's secretary of state, Republican Kim Wyman, won all but three counties: Jefferson, San Juan, and King.  The first two are small, heavily Democratic counties; King, as you probably know, is Seattle and most Seattle suburbs.

You'd think results like that would pique the curiosity of our journalists, and worry elected Democrats, but neither seems to have happened.

(Younger readers may need to know that the United States did not always have this sharp division with Democrats holding almost all urban core districts, and Republicans holding almost all rural districts.  Decades ago, Republicans tended to win wealthy, "silk-stocking" districts in cities, and Democrats tended to win the poorer rural districts.)
- 2:14 PM, 6 December 2016   [link]


This 538 Post won't make my friends in Happy Valley happy.

On the other hand, fans of the University of Washington will be pleased to learn that the model gives them a 36 percent chance of beating Alabama.

(I have no opinion on either claim.)
- 8:26 AM, 6 December 2016   [link]


Voice Acting In The Videogame Business Is Weird:   For one thing, you often don't know what part you are saying, or even what game it will be in.
Colleen O’Shaughnessey was stunned when a fan asked the voice actor to sign his copy of a videogame, “Fallout 4,” at a pop-culture convention earlier this year.

That’s because Ms. O’Shaughnessey, who provided the voice for three minor roles in the top-selling title, had no idea she was in it.
According to the article, "So, You Were the Blue Zombie!", that kind of experience is not all that unusual in the videogame business.

(Here's a description of "Fallout 4" for those like me who are both ignorant and curious.)
- 8:08 AM, 6 December 2016   [link]


Snow Has Arrived In This Area:  In spotty snow showers down here in the lowlands.  But in serious amounts, up at Paradise (altitude approximately 5400 feet), on Mt. Rainier.

Paradise parking lot, 4 December 2016

I saved the picture yesterday.  As you can see, there weren't many visitors there because, I assume, the road below was blocked.

If the weather forecasters are right, and they often are, there may be good views from cameras up on the mountain. starting late tomorrow morning, or afternoon.

Here's a hint, if you are wondering just how much snow they have already.  The low building on the left is a covered entrance way to the public restrooms.  As I recall, the door you see is a standard size.  Or, you can call the park.  They used to put up a recording with the snow accumulation and the snow in the last 24 hours, and I wouldn't be surprised if they still do.
- 7:50 PM, 5 December 2016   [link]


Doggy See, Doggy Do — On Command?  In studying "episodic memory" in dogs, researchers have used a "pretty amazing" training technique:
All attempts to understand thinking and memory in nonverbal animals are difficult, and Dr. Fugazza, Adam Miklosi and Akos Pogany developed a technique that depends on something called “Do-as-I-do training,” which itself is pretty amazing.

In this training, dogs learn to imitate any action the trainer takes.  First the trainer does something like touch an open umbrella with his hand.  Then he says, “Do it.”  Then the dog taps the umbrella with its paw — assuming the training is going well.
That's a much more impressive trick than "shake" or "roll over", or the other common tricks we teach our dogs.
- 4:02 PM, 5 December 2016   [link]


Heinlein's Double Star And Donald Trump:   Recently, I have been speculating that Robert Heinlein's science fiction novel, Double Star, may — I repeat, may — tell us something about Donald Trump's presidency.

In the novel, an out-of-work actor, Lawrence Smith, is hired to impersonate John Joseph Bonforte, who is the leader of His Majesty's Opposition, the Expansionist Party, in a solar system wide constitutional monarchy.  Bonforte has been kidnapped by enemies, shortly before a vote of confidence that will result in a new election, an election Bonforte's party is likely to win.

Smith is able to impersonate Bonforte successfully because he is a good actor, and has the support of Bonforte's inner circle.  (A politician at Bonforte's level is often better understood as a team, rather than a single individual — and all the team, except for Bonforte, is still in place when Smith takes the job.)

In a somewhat similar fashion, Trump has been impersonating a conservative populist, first to get the Republican nomination, and now as he puts together an administration.

And, since he won the nomination, much of the Republican team has been helping him in that role.

There is a good chance, I think, that he will continue that impersonation — because the role requires it.  To get the applause he craves, he will have to, usually, continue in that role.

Having said that, I have to add qualifications.  We will, I assume, occasionally see the private man behind the actor, some leftist positions on trade, and some money grubbing that no conservative could support.

If this argument seems a little strange to you, consider this:  One of the most successful parts of his checkered business career was his acting job on "The Apprentice", where he impersonated a successful business executive.

(Wikipedia's article on Double Star is brief, but gives away the ending.)
- 3:25 PM, 5 December 2016   [link]


Michael Barone Was Right The First Time:  I think.

Here's what Barone thought last year.
Last fall, I shared the widespread view that Clinton was the only Democrat who could lose to Trump and Trump was the only Republican who could lose to Clinton.   Given the fact that elections are a zero-sum game because one candidate must win, this view was more an expression of distaste rather than a prophecy.

But it was based also on polling conducted during the spring, before Trump eliminated his remaining Republican opponents in the Indiana primary on May 3.   National polls and some state polls showed Marco Rubio running stronger against Clinton than Trump, with John Kasich running even stronger and Ted Cruz a bit better.
(I thought, and still think, that the strongest ticket would probably have been Kasich-Rubio.)

That analysis still seems correct to me, but Barone has had second thoughts, as he explains in the rest of the column.

Though I disagree with him, I think his discussion is interesting enough to share.   (And I always like it when a smart analyst admits he might have been wrong.)
- 10:06 AM, 5 December 2016   [link]


Fans Of Time Travel will like this cartoon.
- 9:29 AM, 5 December 2016   [link]


Worth Buying:  This weekend's Wall Street Journal, if only for Roger Pielke Jr.'s op-ed, "My Unhappy Life as a Climate Heretic".
Much to my surprise, I showed up in the WikiLeaks releases before the election.  In a 2014 email, a staffer at the Center for American Progress, founded by John Podesta in 2003, took credit for a campaign to have me eliminated as a writer for Nate Silver’s FiveThirtyEight website.  In the email, the editor of the think tank’s climate blog bragged to one of its billionaire donors, Tom Steyer: “I think it’s fair [to] say that, without Climate Progress, Pielke would still be writing on climate change for 538.”

WikiLeaks provides a window into a world I’ve seen up close for decades: the debate over what to do about climate change, and the role of science in that argument.   Although it is too soon to tell how the Trump administration will engage the scientific community, my long experience shows what can happen when politicians and media turn against inconvenient research—which we’ve seen under Republican and Democratic presidents.
Here's a summary of the findings that made Pieklke into a heretic:  "There is scant evidence to indicate that hurricanes, floods, tornadoes or drought have become more frequent or intense in the U.S. or globally."

Good news, right?  But not if you have been predicting weather disasters.

Incidentally, I think he is right to use a religious term, "heretic".

(You can read much of the op-ed at Watts Up With That?, or use the usual Google search trick to get the whole article, if that issue of the Journal is sold out by the time you look for it.)
- 4:22 PM, 4 December 2016   [link]


Sometimes You Wonder Whether TV News Readers Know Anything About What They Are Reading:  And sometimes you don't.

For instance, yesterday I heard KOMO's Lee Stoll refer to South Korean President Park Geun-hye as "him".

I listened to the rest of the program to see if anyone would correct the mistake.   No one did.

(Stoll has quite pretty hair — and interrupts her co-anchor on their Saturday morning program so often that, when I watch their program, I have begun doing so with my finger poised over the mute button.)
- 3:27 PM, 4 December 2016   [link]


I Think I May have Linked To this cartoon before, but it is so good that it is worth a second look.

(This painting may be one of the inspirations for the cartoon.  And, on a more serious note, here's a map showing the campaign.  It's on my top-ten list of greatest graphics of all time.)
- 10:57 AM, 4 December 2016   [link]


Archives

June 2002
July 2002
August 2002
September 2002
October 2002, Part 1 and Part 2
November 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
December 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3

January 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
February 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
March 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
April 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2004, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2004, Part 1, Part 2. Part 3, and Part 4
October 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2005, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2006, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2007, Part 1 and Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2007, Part 1 Part 2, and Part 3, and Part 4
June 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2008, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4
May 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3. and Part 4

January 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2012, Part 1, Part 2 Part 3, and Part 4
August 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3and Part 4
December 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2013, , Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4
March 2014, Part 1. Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2015, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2015, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2016, Part 1






Coming Soon
  • Plan 17 Conservatives
  • FDR and Waterboarding
  • How Long Do Wars Last?
  • Carbon, Carbon Dioxide, and Crescent Wrenches
  • De-Lawyering and Attorney General McKenna


Coming Eventually
  • JFK and Wiretaps
  • Green Republicans
  • The Rise and Fall and Rise of Black Voting
  • Abortion, Cleft Palates, and Europe
  • Kweisi Mfume's Children
  • Public Opinion During Other US Wars
  • Dual Loyalties
  • The Power Index
  • Baby Dancing
  • Jocks, but no Nerds
  • The Four Caliphs




Best Posts


Books


Strange Obama


The Unknown Bush


University Reform


Uncorrected Mistakes


Vote Fraud


The Gang of Four


Articles


Assignment Desk
(What's This?)


Columns


Common Mistakes
(What's This?)


Chomsky Cult Program


*new