Last updated:
7:16 AM, 24 May 2015



Jim Miller on Politics

  Email:
jimxc1 at gmail.com



What's he reading? Francis Parkman.

News Compilers
(Why These?)

A&L Daily
Drudge
egopnews.com
Hot Air
Jewish World Review
Lexis-Nexis
Lucianne
Mediaite
memeorandum
Monsters and Critics
*newser
Orbusmax
Rantburg
Real Clear Politics
SciTech Daily
Yahoo


Big Media
(Why These?)

Atlantic Monthly
BBC
CNN
Chosen Ilbo
*Daily Mail (UK)
*Deutsche Welle
Fox News
Globe and Mail (CA)
Guardian (UK)
Investor's Business Daily
Le Figaro (FR)
Le Monde (FR)
The Local (Sweden)
National Review
New York Times
The New Yorker
Politico
Seattle PI
Seattle Times
Slate
Slashdot
The Spectator (UK)
Der Spiegel
Telegraph (UK)
Times (UK)
El Universal
U. S. News
USA Today
Wall Street Journal
Washington Examiner
Washington Post
Washington Times


References:

Adherents
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Census Quick Facts
Dave Leip's Election Atlas
FactCheck
Federal Statistics
How Stuff Works
NationMaster
Refdesk
Snopes
StateMaster
Tax Facts
Unionstats
Wikipedia


Smart Media
(Why These?)

ABC News Note
*The American
The American Spectator
Michael Barone
City Journal
Commentary
Front Page Magazine
Michael Fumento
The Hill
Media Research
Michael Medved
New York Sun
Number Watch
PJ Media
Public Interest
Roll Call
Spinsanity
Townhall
The Weekly Standard


Blogs
(Why These?)

My Group Blog:
Sound Politics

Northwest:


The American Empire
AndrewsDad
Chief Brief
Clear Fog Blog
Coffeemonkey's weblog
Croker Sack
"DANEgerus"
Economic Freedom
Federal Way Conservative
Freedom Foundation
Hairy Thoughts
Huckleberry Online
Andy MacDonald
NW Republican
Orcinus
Public Interest Transportation Forum
<pudge/*>
Northwest Progressive Institute
*Progressive Majority
Matt Rosenberg
Seattle Blogger
Seattle Bubble
Washington Policy Center
West Sound Politics
Zero Base Thinking


Other US:


Ace of Spades HQ
Alien Corn
Ann Althouse
American Thinker
The Anchoress
Armies of Liberation
Art Contrarian
"Baldilocks"
Balloon Juice
Baseball Crank
La Shawn Barber
Beldar
Bleat
Big Government
Bookworm Room
Broadband Politics
Stuart Buck
Keith Burgess-Jackson
*Bush Center
Chef Mojo
Chicago Boyz
Classical Values
*College Insurrection
Confederate Yankee
Jules Crittenden
Daily Pundit
Discriminations
Gregory Djerejian
Daniel W. Drezner
Econlog
Econopundit
Election Law
John Ellis
Engage
Dean Esmay
Gary Farber
Fausta
FiveThirtyEight
Flares into Darkness
Flopping Aces
The Long War Journal
Gateway Pundit
Grasping Reality With Both Hands
Keith Hennessey
Hugh Hewitt
Siflay Hraka
Instapundit
Iowahawk
Joanne Jacobs
Jeff Jarvis
The Jawa Report
Brothers Judd
JustOneMinute
Kausfiles
Kesher Talk
Le-gal In-sur-rec-tion
Little Green Footballs
Megan McArdle
Michelle Malkin
Greg Mankiw
Marginal Revolution
Mazurland
Minding the Campus
The ModerateVoice
*The Monkey Cage Mudville Gazette
"neo-neocon"
Betsy Newmark
Newsbusters
No Watermelons Allowed
Ambra Nykola
*The Optimistic Conservative
The Ornery American
OxBlog
Parapundit
"Patterico"
Daniel Pipes
Polipundit
Political Arithmetik
Political Calculations
Pollster.com
Power and Control
Power Line
Protein Wisdom
QandO
Radio Equalizer
RedState
Riehl World View
Right Wing News
Rightwing Nuthouse
Dr. Sanity
Scrappleface
Screw Loose Change
Linda Seebach
Sense of Events
Joshua Sharf
Rand Simberg
Smart Politics
The Spirit of Enterprise
Stability For Our Time
*Strange Maps
The Strata-Sphere
Andrew Sullivan
Don Surber
Sweetness & Light
Taking Hayek Seriously
TalkLeft
Talking Points Memo
TaxProf
USS Neverdock
VDH's Private Papers
Verum Serum
Villainous Company
Volokh Conspiracy
Washington Monthly
Wizbang
Dr. Weevil
Matt Welch
Winds of Change
Meryl Yourish
zombietime


Canadians:


BlazingCatFur
Colby Cosh
Five Feet of Fury
Kate McMillan
Damian Penny
Bruce Rolston


Latin America:


Babalú
Caracas Chronicles
The Devil's Excrement
Venezuela News and Views


Overseas:


"Franco Aleman"
Bruce Bawer
Biased BBC
Tim Blair
*Andrew Bolt
Peter Briffa
Brussels Journal
*Bunyipitude
Butterflies and Wheels
Crooked Timber
Davids Medienkritik
Egyptian Sand Monkey
EU Referendum
Greenie Watch
Guido Fawkes
Harry's Place
Mick Hartley
Oliver Kamm
JG, Caesarea
*Le Monde Watch
¡No-Pasarán!
Fredrik Norman
Melanie Phillips
John Ray
samizdata
Shark Blog
Natalie Solent
Somtow's World
Bjørn Stærk
Laban Tall
*David Thompson
Michael Yon
This is Zimbabwe

Science Blogs:
The Blackboard
Cliff Mass Weather
Climate Audit
Climate Depot
Climate Science
*Judith Curry
Future Pundit
Gene Expression
The Loom
In The Pipeline
Roger Pielke Jr.
Real Climate
A Voyage To Arcturus
Watts Up With That?

Media Blogs:
Andrew Malcolm
Dori Monson
David Postman
Rhetorical Ammo
Tierney Lab
*White House Dossier

R-Rated:
Horse's A**
Huffington Post

*new



Memorial Day:  When we should remember these brave men in Arlington Cemetery.

Arlington Cemetery

Earlier posts on Memorial Day here, here, here, here, and here.

(Recycled from 2009.)
- 7:16 AM, 24 May 2015   [link]


Newt Gingrich Is A Talented Polemicist:  As you can see in this piece, where he blames the ills of Baltimore on — Democrats.

Here's how he begins:
Fact:  The last Republican city council member in Baltimore City left office in 1942.  That is 73 years of solid Democrat city councils.

Fact:  The last Republican mayor of Baltimore City left office in 1967.   That is 48 years of unbroken Democrat control of the mayor’s office.
(He continues, at some length, with those facts.)

Talented enough so that, even as a Republican back bencher in the House, he was sometimes able to get coverage for his ideas from "mainstream" journalists.

After you enjoy that polemic — if you are a Republican or just like effective rhetoric — you might take some time to think about his analysis, and his proposals for reform.

I would say that there is much truth in his analysis although, not surprisingly, he leaves out non-governmental causes, and that his reform proposals would have mostly good effects, though not as large as he might claim.
- 8:20 AM, 22 May 2015   [link]


Taking Your Dog For A Walk?  Then you might want to tell it about this study.
The bond between humans and dogs can feel very strong, deep and profound. It may also be much older than we once thought.

A group of researchers discovered an ancient wolf bone and say its DNA suggests dogs diverged from wolves 27,000 to 40,000 years ago -- not 11,000 to 16,000 years ago, as previous research has suggested.  The researchers published their findings Thursday in the journal Current Biology.
Actually, if you follow that link, you'll find that the estimates on dog domestication vary widely, though it is true that 11,000 to 16,000 years ago has been (and may still be) one of the more accepted ranges.  (You can download the paper — I'd say a reader with some scientific background can understand most of it — or you can glance through this Wikipedia article to get an idea of how much those estimates have varied.)

It isn't hard to guess why the article didn't mention the range of previous estimates; most likely the reporter, Elahe Izadi, re-wrote a Harvard press release, which had already simplified the background.

Finally, note that, in most of the world, dogs are not man's best friend:
The dog was the first domesticated animal[4][5] and although it is said that the "dog is man's best friend"[6] regarding 17-24% of dogs in the developed countries, in the developing world they are feral, village or community dogs, with pet dogs uncommon.[7]  These live their lives as scavengers and have never been owned by humans, with one study showing their most common response when approached by strangers was to run away (52%) or respond with aggression (11%).[8]
If we had a time machine and could go back to the tribes that first domesticated dogs, I suspect we would find something similar, with the first dogs being, not "best friends", but uneasy allies.
- 7:14 AM, 22 May 2015   [link]


Before We Had Radiometric Dating, geologists could often place the ages of rocks, relatively; they could often tell you which rock was older than another rock.

But they couldn't tell you how old any particular rock was, and their estimates were often wildly off.

I was reminded of that a few weeks ago, when I was re-reading Hans Zinsser's classic, Rats, Lice, and History, and came across this passage:
Reasoner has collected from the paleontological literature a number of descriptions of conditions of bacterial origin occurring in prehistoric animal remains.  He mentions the remains of a reptile, Dimetrodon, of the Permian age (21,000,00 years ago), described by Gilmore, in which there was evidence of chronic osteomylitis of the spine; also a Jurassic crocodile (14,000,000 years ago) described by Auer, which presented signs of infection in the pelvis, with metastases in the femur, the sacral vertebrae, and the palate. (p. 105)
You don't have to know a lot about geology to recognize that those ages for the Permian and the Jurassic are both off by more than a hundred million years.

Zinsser was a medical researcher, and was probably using estimates from a standard, but perhaps a little dated, geology text.  (His father-in-law was a mineralogist.)

So he was most likely repeating mistakes that respected and, for their time, competent, geologists had made.

(I said Zinsser's book is a classic; I suppose I should expand on that a little for those who have not read the book.  Zinsser describes how diseases, especially typhus, have changed history in a book that begins with a twelve-chapter-long digression — an entertaining digression — and gives us, without intending to, a partial picture of his times.  The book will make you laugh — and make you think.

If you want to know more about geologic dating, I'd suggest you start here, and then move on, if you want to know details, to this article.)
- 6:25 PM, 21 May 2015   [link]


Baltimore Police Indicted; Baltimore Crime Soars:   Minorities hardest hit.
The 28-year-old [Andre] Hunt was lured out of the barbershop, according to his attorney, and shot in the back of the head on the afternoon of April 29.  He was among more than 30 people slain in Baltimore in 30 days, an alarming number of killings and part of an undercurrent of violence here.

Although riots and protests after the death of Freddie Gray, who was injured in police custody, brought national attention to the city, the slayings have attracted little notice.  They come as Baltimore works to recover from the unrest, with a police force demoralized by the arrests of six of its members — three of whom face murder or manslaughter charges in Gray’s death — and under the scrutiny of the Justice Department.
. . .
A month before Gray’s death, Bryant joined Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake (D) at a summit to urge black men to help stop black-on-black killings.  African Americans comprised 211 of Baltimore’s 216 homicide victims in 2014.
And probably just as high a proportion now.

Be sure to take a look at the graphic, which shows how the murder rate increased, starting on 27 April.

By way of Paul Mirengoff.

(For the record:  Mirengoff is certain that police who arrested Freddie Gray did something wrong.  I am not so sure about that, because I still have seen no explanation of how he was injured, how his spinal cord was almost severed.  I am not even sure the injury happened after Gray was arrested.  I can think of scenarios in which the police are almost blameless, and others in which manslaughter, or even murder, might be appropriate charges.

Baltimore's population is about 620,000, of whom about 64 percent are black.  If the upsurge in murders continues, about 300 people, almost all of them black, will be murdered in Baltimore this year.  Those murders will draw almost no national attention.)
- 12:55 PM, 21 May 2015   [link]


Judging By Top Offices Held, "The GOP Is the Strongest It's Been in Decades", the strongest, specifically, since 1928.
Last fall, RCP Election Analyst David Byler and I put together an index of party strength.   While most journalists look at presidential performance as a measure of party strength (see the ubiquitous “Republicans have lost the popular vote in five of the last six elections”), we take a broader view of party strength.  Rather than look simply at presidential performance, we look at party dominance at the federal, congressional, and state levels.  One need only look at fights over voter identification laws, redistricting, food stamp benefits, Obamacare expansion, and a multitude of other battles from the last few years alone to understand the importance of non-federal elections.  We therefore believe this approach gives a more complete measure of party strength.
. . .
Overall, this gives the Republicans an index score of 33.8.  This is the Republican Party’s best showing in the index since 1928, and marks only the third time that the party has been above 15 in the index since the end of World War II.
These indexes are always somewhat arbitrary, but this strikes me as a reasonable one, especially since Sean Trende and David Byler show that some of the plausible changes in their index would have little effect on the values.

Two thoughts:  First, it seems clear to me that Republican voters are now distributed in ways that help the party win House seats and state legislatures; there are many Democratic districts where the incumbent may get 80 or even 90 percent of the vote, but few similar Republican districts.

Second, although Republicans may be stronger than at any time since 1928, the same is not true of conservatives.  Beginning in the late 1930s, Southern Democrats were often more conservative on economic issues and foreign policy than Northern Democrats, and often joined with Republicans on those issues.

(I began with a qualifier, because I think that qualifier is essential to understanding what you can, and can not, conclude from this study.  There is a more common way to judge the strengths of the parties, the simple democratic way of counting the numbers who belong to each party.  If you use that, you come to somewhat different conclusions.)
- 7:51 AM, 21 May 2015   [link]


Washington State Now has its first dinosaur fossil.
Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture paleontologists have documented the first dinosaur fossil from Washington state.  The fossil was collected by a Burke Museum research team along the shores of Sucia Island State Park in the San Juan Islands.
It's a small piece of a theropod's femur, and was found two years ago, here.  It's about 80 million years old.

That find makes Washington one of 37 states where dinosaur fossils have been found.

(Why are dinosaur fossils so rare here?  Because the exposed rocks of the right age — about 240 to 66 million years ago — are almost all marine rocks, and dinosaurs were land animals,  This fossil was washed out to sea and buried with a bunch of clams, and other sea animals.)
- 7:15 AM, 21 May 2015   [link]


Wonder Why The British Polls Were So Wrong?  So do the pollsters.  Mark Blumenthal and company describe seven possible ways the pollsters might have gone wrong.

I am pleased to see that Harry Enten found that the poll results were suspiciously close.
Herding - FiveThirtyEight's Harry Enten noticed that national polls "seemed to converge rapidly in the final days of the campaign."   Virtually all of the final UK polls showed a one point or even margin Labour and the Tories (the one notable exception was an online poll conducted by SurveyMonkey, which correctly forecast the size of the Tory win).  Enten calculated a standard deviation to measure the variation across the final polls in their estimate of the margin between the top two candidates.  His findings show the UK poll results converging to a greater degree this year than in any other election since 1979.  Perhaps confirming the trend, one pollster claimed they "chickened out" and failed to publish results giving the Tories a wider lead because "the results seemed so 'out of line' with all the polling conducted by ourselves and our peers."
Because that's what I thought when I looked at the final polls; the "consensus" was suspicious.
- 6:24 PM, 20 May 2015   [link]


Josh Earnest On The Ramadi Defeat:  Yesterday, President Obama's press secretary took many questions on the defeat at Ramadi.  The answer he gave to ABC's Jonathan Karl got the most attention:
Q  Now, on the overall track record of military operations of the President’s strategy on this, you said we've seen periods of progress and success.  Would you say that overall, this strategy has been a success?

MR. EARNEST:  Well, Jon, yes.  Overall, yes.  It doesn’t mean that there haven't been areas of setback, as we saw in Ramadi.

Q  I mean, is exporting terror to Libya, taking over the capital of Iraq’s largest province -- this is overall success?

MR. EARNEST:  What we've also seen is we've also seen a coalition of 60 nations both in the region and around the world join the United States in this fight.  We've seen a new Prime Minister take office in Iraq and unite that country and deploy a multi-sectarian security force against ISIL that has succeeded in liberating important areas of Diyala and Babil and Nineveh and the Kirkuk Provinces.  We've seen important Iraqi security force gains in Tikrit * and Ramadi.  We've also seen strategic areas like Sinjar Mountain and Mosul Dam where Iraqi security forces have emerged victorious.

So we have seen a lot of success.  But we've also seen significant periods of setback.  And that's part of what a military conflict is going to be, particularly when it's going to be a long-term proposition like this one.
(You can tell from the answer that Earnest was prepared for the question, and had his talking points ready.)

That answer made me wonder whether Earnest had said the same thing to other reporters, and whether he had walked back that "Overall" claim.

So I went through the transcript, and found that he had said essentially the same thing to "Jim", Nadia", "Carol", and "Bill".  (My apologies for giving first names only, as the transcript does.)  And that he never walked back that assessment, never qualified it, in any meaningful way.

So I think we can conclude that the official White House position is that our war with ISIS is an overall success.

Near the end there was a significant exchange with "Kevin":
Q  Ten thousand -- we’ve heard that figure used before, say, that we would like to have seen what might have happened if say, 10,000 were left there.

MR. EARNEST:  Well, that's been speculation. And --

Q   -- to consider that?

MR. EARNEST:  Well, again, I’m not going to get into the hypothetical thing. But what I will do is I will tell you exactly what the President’s view is on this -- that committing hundreds of thousands of U.S. ground troops to Iraq on a sustained ground combat operation is not in the best interests of the United States and is not something that the President will consider.  And incidentally, it’s not something that his military leaders have recommended.

Q  But they have mentioned, say, 10,000 might make a difference.  Does the White House believe it would make no difference to, say, have 10,000 more troops on the ground in Iraq?

MR. EARNEST:  I’m not going to speculate on future recommendations that the President may receive from his military officials.  But I’ll just -- for the mathematicians out there, I’ll highlight the significant difference between 150,000 U.S. troops and 10,000.
Those questions didn't have the if-you-knew-then-what-you-know-now form, but that was what "Kevin" was asking.  And you will notice that Earnest doesn't answer him, doesn't even try to defend Obama's decision to withdraw all American ground troops from Iraq.
- 2:05 PM, 20 May 2015   [link]


Osama Bin Laden Read Noam Chomsky:  In 2004, and then again in 2012, I noted the remarkable similarities between the ideas of the terrorist leader, and the far-left MIT linguist.

Now, we know one possible reason for that similarity; two of Chomsky's books were on bin Laden's "bookshelf", along with many books devoted to spreading conspiracy theories.

Or perhaps I should say many other books devoted to spreading conspiracy theories, since I have long thought that Chomsky often spreads conspiracy theories, when he discusses politics.

(Which two Chomsky books?   Hegemony or Survival and Necessary Illusions.

I don't know if Chomsky is pleased by his influence on the late terrorist leader, but another American, William Blum, was delighted when he learned that bin Laden was reading his books.)
- 8:52 AM, 20 May 2015   [link]


High-Heel Gate?  This morning, one of our local TV stations — I'm leaving out the name to protect the guilty — decided that one of the most important news stories for their local broadcast was that a French film festival was, or was not, requiring women to wear high heels to a film showing.
Cannes Film Festival organisers denied a report Tuesday that they were enforcing a strict high-heel rule for women on the event's legendary red carpet after a storm of protest on social media.
Ever think our journalists, especially our TV journalists, may be just a little frivolous?

(For the record:  I know that high heels often make women look sexier, but I seldom see a woman wearing them without wondering whether her feet hurt and feeling, not attraction, but sympathy.

I have no idea how common that attitude is among men.  But I can pass along this story.  A friend who had worked for a large and well-known company decades ago told me that the executives there (all men at the time) had voluntarily given up their reserved parking places, close to the office, so that their secretaries (all women at the time) would not have to walk some distance, in high heels.)
- 7:07 AM, 20 May 2015   [link]


Archives

June 2002
July 2002
August 2002
September 2002
October 2002, Part 1 and Part 2
November 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
December 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3

January 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
February 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
March 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
April 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2004, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2004, Part 1, Part 2. Part 3, and Part 4
October 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2005, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2006, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2007, Part 1 and Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2007, Part 1 Part 2, and Part 3, and Part 4
June 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2008, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4
May 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3. and Part 4

January 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2012, Part 1, Part 2 Part 3, and Part 4
August 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3and Part 4
December 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2013, , Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4
March 2014, Part 1. Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2015, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3






Coming Soon
  • Plan 17 Conservatives
  • FDR and Waterboarding
  • How Long Do Wars Last?
  • Carbon, Carbon Dioxide, and Crescent Wrenches
  • De-Lawyering and Attorney General McKenna


Coming Eventually
  • JFK and Wiretaps
  • Green Republicans
  • The Rise and Fall and Rise of Black Voting
  • Abortion, Cleft Palates, and Europe
  • Kweisi Mfume's Children
  • Public Opinion During Other US Wars
  • Dual Loyalties
  • The Power Index
  • Baby Dancing
  • Jocks, but no Nerds
  • The Four Caliphs




Best Posts


Books


Strange Obama


The Unknown Bush


University Reform


Uncorrected Mistakes


Vote Fraud


The Gang of Four


Articles


Assignment Desk
(What's This?)


Columns


Common Mistakes
(What's This?)


Chomsky Cult Program


*new