Last updated:
3:29 PM, 26 February 2015



Jim Miller on Politics

  Email:
jimxc1 at gmail.com



What's he reading? Francis Parkman.

News Compilers
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A&L Daily
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egopnews.com
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Atlantic Monthly
BBC
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Chosen Ilbo
*Daily Mail (UK)
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Times (UK)
El Universal
U. S. News
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Washington Times


References:

Adherents
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Dave Leip's Election Atlas
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How Stuff Works
NationMaster
Refdesk
Snopes
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Smart Media
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ABC News Note
*The American
The American Spectator
Michael Barone
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Commentary
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The Hill
Charles Krauthammer
Media Research
Michael Medved
New York Sun
Number Watch
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Public Interest
Roll Call
Spinsanity
Townhall
The Weekly Standard


Blogs
(Why These?)

My Group Blog:
Sound Politics

Northwest:


The American Empire
AndrewsDad
Chief Brief
Clear Fog Blog
Coffeemonkey's weblog
Croker Sack
"DANEgerus"
Economic Freedom
Federal Way Conservative
Freedom Foundation
Hairy Thoughts
Huckleberry Online
Andy MacDonald
NW Republican
Orcinus
Public Interest Transportation Forum
<pudge/*>
Northwest Progressive Institute
*Progressive Majority
Matt Rosenberg
Seattle Blogger
Seattle Bubble
Washington Policy Center
West Sound Politics
Zero Base Thinking


Other US:


Ace of Spades HQ
Alien Corn
Ann Althouse
American Thinker
The Anchoress
Armies of Liberation
Art Contrarian
"Baldilocks"
Balloon Juice
Baseball Crank
La Shawn Barber
Beldar
Bleat
Big Government
Bookworm Room
Broadband Politics
Stuart Buck
Keith Burgess-Jackson
*Bush Center
Chef Mojo
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*College Insurrection
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Daily Pundit
Discriminations
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Daniel W. Drezner
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Election Law
John Ellis
Engage
Dean Esmay
Gary Farber
Fausta
FiveThirtyEight
Flares into Darkness
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Gateway Pundit
Grasping Reality With Both Hands
Keith Hennessey
Hugh Hewitt
Siflay Hraka
Instapundit
Iowahawk
Joanne Jacobs
Jeff Jarvis
The Jawa Report
Brothers Judd
JustOneMinute
Kausfiles
Kesher Talk
Le-gal In-sur-rec-tion
Little Green Footballs
Megan McArdle
Michelle Malkin
Greg Mankiw
Marginal Revolution
Mazurland
Minding the Campus
The ModerateVoice
*The Monkey Cage Mudville Gazette
"neo-neocon"
Betsy Newmark
Newsbusters
No Watermelons Allowed
Ambra Nykola
*The Optimistic Conservative
The Ornery American
OxBlog
Parapundit
"Patterico"
Daniel Pipes
Polipundit
Political Arithmetik
Political Calculations
Pollster.com
Power and Control
Power Line
Protein Wisdom
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Radio Equalizer
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Riehl World View
Right Wing News
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Dr. Sanity
Scrappleface
Screw Loose Change
Linda Seebach
Sense of Events
Joshua Sharf
Rand Simberg
Smart Politics
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Stability For Our Time
*Strange Maps
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Andrew Sullivan
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TaxProf
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VDH's Private Papers
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Winds of Change
Meryl Yourish
zombietime


Canadians:


BlazingCatFur
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Five Feet of Fury
Kate McMillan
Damian Penny
Bruce Rolston


Latin America:


Babalú
Caracas Chronicles
The Devil's Excrement
Venezuela News and Views


Overseas:


"Franco Aleman"
Bruce Bawer
Biased BBC
Tim Blair
*Andrew Bolt
Peter Briffa
Brussels Journal
*Bunyipitude
Butterflies and Wheels
Crooked Timber
Davids Medienkritik
Egyptian Sand Monkey
EU Referendum
Greenie Watch
Guido Fawkes
Harry's Place
Mick Hartley
Oliver Kamm
JG, Caesarea
*Le Monde Watch
¡No-Pasarán!
Fredrik Norman
Melanie Phillips
John Ray
samizdata
Shark Blog
Natalie Solent
Somtow's World
Bjørn Stærk
Laban Tall
*David Thompson
Michael Yon
This is Zimbabwe

Science Blogs:
The Blackboard
Cliff Mass Weather
Climate Audit
Climate Depot
Climate Science
*Judith Curry
Future Pundit
Gene Expression
The Loom
In The Pipeline
Roger Pielke Jr.
Real Climate
A Voyage To Arcturus
Watts Up With That?

Media Blogs:
Andrew Malcolm
Dori Monson
David Postman
Rhetorical Ammo
Tierney Lab
*White House Dossier

R-Rated:
Horse's A**
Huffington Post

*new



Pseudo-Random Thoughts

"Jihadi John" is Mohammed Emwazi.
LONDON — The world knows him as “Jihadi John,” the masked man with a British accent who has beheaded several hostages held by the Islamic State and who taunts audiences in videos circulated widely online.

But his real name, according to friends and others familiar with his case, is Mohammed Emwazi, a Briton from a well-to-do family who grew up in West London and graduated from college with a degree in computer programming.  He is believed to have traveled to Syria around 2012 and to have later joined the Islamic State, the group whose barbarity he has come to symbolize.
It would be interesting to know whether he was radicalized at the University of Westminster, where he earned his degree.  So many leaders of al Qaeda and ISIL appear to have become extremists while attending a university in the West that I hope someone will check into that possibility.

Obviously, he was not a desperate and impoverished man, when he chose to become an Islamic extremist.  It shouldn't be necessary to say that — except that the news that Islamic extremists are not necessarily desperate and poor hasn't reached everyone on the left, including some in our State Department.

(News from nowhere:  This article, and a derivative one from the BBC, read oddly, because they don't say how the news organizations learned his identity.  Both tell us that the American and British security services had figured out who he was by last September at the latest, but don't tell us why the Post decided to interview those who knew him in Britain.  Most likely there was a leak, perhaps deliberate, perhaps unintentional.)
- 3:29 PM, 26 February 2015   [link]


Who Pays Extra For Wi-Fi?  People who stay in luxury hotels.
Coffee shops, airports, public buildings and even budget hotels have all succumbed to pressure to offer Wi-Fi connections free.  One big hotel chain, Hyatt Hotels, began offering free Wi-Fi for all guests as of Valentine’s Day, calling it a “basic expectation” of travelers.

But most full-service and luxury hotels are resisting mightily, raising their fees, instituting upcharges for “high-speed” service and generally making Wi-Fi the hotel equivalent of airline baggage fees.

The add-on charges for in-room Internet service let hotels advertise a lower price and then boost per-night revenue by 5% to 10%.  (The cost can be just as much or more as getting Wi-Fi on an airplane.)
(Budget motels have been offering Wi-Fi at no extra charge for years.)

The mark-ups are extraordinary, with a few hotels charging as much as thirty dollars a day.  (The article doesn't give cost estimates for providing the service, but I doubt that the marginal cost of providing Wi-Fi could be much higher than a nickel or dime a day, per room.)

Presumably, the high-end hotels are getting away with these charges because most of their clients are not especially price sensitive.  But if you are price sensitive, beware.

(There are security considerations, too.  Everything else being equal, I would rather access the Internet from a private hotel room than a public coffee shop.)
- 7:40 AM, 26 February 2015   [link]


The Clintons And Foreign Money, Again:  Here's the Washington Post story on the latest Clinton scandal.
The Clinton Foundation accepted millions of dollars from seven foreign governments during Hillary Rodham Clinton’s tenure as secretary of state, including one donation that violated its ethics agreement with the Obama administration, foundation officials disclosed Wednesday.

Most of the contributions were possible because of exceptions written into the foundation’s 2008 agreement, which included limits on foreign-government donations.

The agreement, reached before Clinton’s nomination amid concerns that countries could use foundation donations to gain favor with a Clinton-led State Department, allowed governments that had previously donated money to continue making contributions at similar levels.
(How many millions?  The Post doesn't say.)

Now that she is no longer secretary of state, that agreement doesn't apply, and the foundation has been accepting all kinds of money from foreign nations.  You don't have to be a cynic to suspect that some of those nations do not have entirely pure motives.

Again?   Sure, though younger readers may not have heard about "Chinagate", as the scandal is usually called.
The 1996 United States campaign finance controversy was an alleged effort by the People's Republic of China to influence domestic American politics prior to and during the Clinton administration and also involved the fund-raising practices of the administration itself.

While questions regarding the U.S. Democratic Party's fund-raising activities first arose over a Los Angeles Times article published on September 21, 1996,[1]   China's alleged role in the affair first gained public attention when Bob Woodward and Brian Duffy of The Washington Post published a story stating that a United States Department of Justice investigation into the fund-raising activities had uncovered evidence that agents of China sought to direct contributions from foreign sources to the Democratic National Committee (DNC) before the 1996 presidential campaign.  The journalists wrote that intelligence information had shown the Chinese Embassy in Washington, D.C. was used for coordinating contributions to the DNC[2] in violation of United States law forbidding non-American citizens or non-permanent residents from giving monetary donations to United States politicians and political parties.  A Republican investigator of the controversy stated the Chinese plan targeted both presidential and congressional United States elections, while Democratic Senators said the evidence showed the Chinese targeted only congressional elections.  The Chinese government denied all accusations.
Most Republicans believe that the Chinese government traded millions in illegal campaign contributions for billions in American military technology, and influence on American foreign policy.  There is much evidence to support that unpleasant conclusion.

The Wikipedia article omits this famous quotation, from one of the intermediaries:
For all of his notoriety, history may remember Johnny Chung for having coined a phrase.   It was Chung who said, "The White House is like a subway: You have to put in coins to open the gates."  Chung ought to have known: He ponyed up hundreds of thousands of dollars to get into the White House some 50 times between February 1994 and February 1996 -- and he paid his fare, but not in coin.  Chung wrote 12 checks to the Democratic National Committee totaling $366,000 (the DNC has since returned the money); one check for $10,000 to the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee; and five checks for (a total of) $10,000 to five other Democrats.
If either of the Clintons felt guilty about this exchange, it is not apparent from what they have said, publicly.  So it isn't surprising to see them doing the same thing, though more discreetly, through a charitable foundation.

There are other benefits to using a charitable foundation as an intermediary.  For example, John Hinderaker is probably right to suspect that the foundation has been used as a "slush fund" for the Clintons.

(Two technical points:  The Wikipedia article on Chinagate has varied considerably over the years because, I assume, of a struggle between pro-Clinton and anti-Clinton contributors.   At one point, the former had actually erased "Chinagate" from the article, making it harder to find.

This may seem odd, but Clinton operatives may be responsible for the Post article.   During some of the scandals while Clinton was president, they deliberately leaked damaging information that they knew was bound to come out, anyway.  They believed, correctly in my opinion, that they could limit the damage that way.)
- 6:38 AM, 26 February 2015   [link]


Jihadis Who Don't want jobs.
Six men detained for more than 12 years at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba and then sent to Montevideo have upset Uruguay’s government after officials offered them jobs — and they said no.

President Jose Mujica agreed to help resettle the ex-inmates as a goodwill gesture, The Associated Press reported.  But a labor union in the country said the men have turned down several job offers.  And now Mr. Mujica is characterizing them as somewhat lazy.
They don't appear to be interested in regular jobs, anyway.

By way of Mr. Fur.
- 8:02 AM, 25 February 2015   [link]


Two Editorial Cartoons To Start Out Your Day:  One from Michael Ramirez on President Obama's jobs for jihadis program.

And one from Gary Varvel on "handsy" Joe Biden.

(Here's an explanation of Biden's behavior:
That’s called social intelligence, and according to David Givens, who heads the Center for Nonverbal Studies, the veep doesn’t have it.

“His social intelligence is not quite to the point of being good enough for the vice president,” said Givens.  “His emotions get expressed beyond the comfort zone of a lot of people.”
News you may be able to use:  According to another expert (or, possibly, "expert"), that "comfort zone" is about 9 inches.  Anyone who gets closer than that, without an invitation, makes most of us uneasy.  From my own experience, I know that the comfort zone varies by age, sex, ethnicity, et cetera, but 9 inches may be about right — as an average, here in the United States.)
- 7:39 AM, 25 February 2015   [link]


President Obama Vetoed The Keystone XL Pipeline:  But says he has yet to decide on the merits of the pipeline.
Defying the Republican-run Congress, President Barack Obama rejected a bill Tuesday to approve construction of the Keystone XL oil pipeline, wielding his veto power for only the third time in his presidency.

Obama offered no indication of whether he'll eventually issue a permit for the pipeline, whose construction has become a flashpoint in the U.S. debate about environmental policy and climate change.  Instead, Obama sought to reassert his authority to make the decision himself, rebuffing GOP lawmakers who will control both the House and Senate for the remain
(Emphasis added.)

If President Obama had opposed the pipeline within a year or two after it was proposed, I would have understood, even though I disagreed with his decision.  If he had waited until after the 2012 or 2014 election, for political reasons, I would have thought that contemptible, but I would understand why he had made our Canadian friends wait so long for a decision.

But to claim now that the process which began in 2008 still needs more time is insulting to our Canadian allies, and to the intelligence of the American people.  The project had to receive permission from several bureaucracies.  Two of them acted with reasonable speed (for a bureaucracy).
The Keystone XL extension was proposed in 2008.[20]  The application was filed in September 2008 and the National Energy Board of Canada started hearings in September 2009.[38]  On March 11, 2010 the Canadian National Energy Board approved the project.[18][28][39]  The South Dakota Public Utilities Commission granted a permit on February 19, 2010.[40]
All of the bureaucracies controlled by the Obama administration have delayed, and delayed, and delayed.

So this song goes out to President Obama:

Who really ought to "finally decide" — now.
- 4:45 PM, 24 February 2015   [link]


Anatolia Or The Steppes, Agriculture Or Conquest:  The debate over the origin of Indo-European languages continues, with the side arguing for the steppes and conquest gaining, from two new findings.
The peoples of India, Iran and Europe speak a Babel of tongues, but most — English included — are descended from an ancient language known as proto-Indo-European.  Scholars have argued for two centuries about the identity and homeland of those who spoke this parent language, but a surprisingly sudden resolution of this longstanding issue may be at hand.
Not only were they arguing about the origin of indo-Europeans, they were also arguing about how they spread, by farmers slowly diffusing, peacefully, out of the Middle East, or by conquerors using chariots and bronze weapons to expand out of their base in the steppes.

A few years ago, computational methods appeared to give an edge to the Anatolia/agriculture hypothesis, because the date of the root language, "7,800 to 9,800 years ago", fit Anatolia better than the steppes.  But now what appears to be a needed correction in those calculations changed the date to "6,500 years old", which fits the steppe hypothesis.

The second finding seems stronger evidence to me, though Nicholas Wade gives it less space.
A second boost for the steppe theory has emerged from the largest study of ancient DNA in Europe, based on analysis of 69 people who lived 3,000 to 8,000 years ago.  Patterns in the DNA bear evidence of a migration into Germany some 4,500 years ago of people from the Yamnaya culture of the steppes, the first to develop a pastoral economy based on wagons, sheep and horses.  So extensive was this migration that three-quarters of the ancient people sampled in Germany bear Yamnaya-type DNA, says a team led by Wolfgang Haak of the University of Adelaide, Australia, and David Reich of Harvard Medical School.  Their report was posted this month on bioRxiv.
The disagreement is partly between disciplines, with linguists tending to favor the steppe hypothesis, and archaeologists tending to favor Anatolia.

For more, you'll want to skim the article; for much more, you'll want to read the whole article, carefully.

(Here's a 2012 article by Wade, giving the other side.

For background, here are the Wikipedia articles on the steppe hypothesis and the Anatolian hypothesis.

Finally, a bit of irony.  The best-known city in the steppe area is now known as Volgograd, but is better known by the name it had during World War II, Stalingrad.  The German soldiers attempting to capture the city were attempting to return to the ancient homeland their ancestors had once shared with the ancestors of their Russian enemies.)
- 3:05 PM, 24 February 2015   [link]


Andrew Malcolm Gives President Obama some credit.
We now know that Barack Obama has very few useful presidential skills.  One of them is the guile to appear absolutely, 100% genuinely sincere when he says one thing.  And then, just months later, to appear absolutely, 100% genuinely sincere when saying exactly the opposite.
And then gives an example of that guile in a one-minute video.

Barack Obama is one of the best I have seen at faking sincerity.  It's unfortunate that he didn't go to Hollywood or on stage, instead of into politics.

(It would be interesting to know whether Obama, like Bill Clinton, has had the help of a drama coach.  As I recall, Bill Clinton was getting regular lessons from Sheehan — while Clinton was president.)
- 8:34 AM, 24 February 2015   [link]


What's Sauce For The Mixed-Race Gander Is Sauce For The Jewish Goose?  Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz has not been a great success as chair of the Democratic National Committee.  So it is no surprise that some in her party were thinking that a replacement might be in order.

But the congresswoman knew how to fight back.  She had seen how often Barack Obama had used the race card to get out of political trouble, and so, if this account is correct, she threatened to play the woman and Jewish cards.
Throughout her time as chair, Wasserman Schultz has turned off colleagues, other top Democrats and current and former staff for a management style that strikes many as self-centered — even for a politician — and often at the expense of the DNC or individual candidates or campaigns.   Many top Democrats, including some she counts as supporters and friends, privately complain about her trying to use the DNC as a vehicle for her own personal promotion, and letting her own ambition get in the way of larger goals.

Wasserman Schultz has a different sense of herself.  According to people who spoke with her, when she sensed Obama was considering replacing her as chair in 2013, she began to line up supporters to suggest the move was both anti-woman and anti-Semitic.  Under fire last fall for her leadership, she took Obama’s decision not to remove her then as evidence of renewed strength and said she was confident no one could get her out of the DNC before her term is over at the beginning of 2017, according to sources who’ve spoken with her.  She’s also been known to joke around the office about how having a vacation home in New Hampshire might one day be helpful in a presidential run.
(Emphasis added.)

In the modern Democratic Party, everyone except heterosexual white guys have one or more identity cards to play and, given their power within the party, it's no surprise that she would threaten to use hers.  Usually, however, identity cards are used more subtly.  Wasserman Schulz may have felt threatened enough so that subtlety was not appropriate.

(As Mediaite notes, that revelation was "[b]uried inside" the Politico story.  I suspect that it was buried deliberately; the reporter, Edward-Isaac Dovere, probably realized that he had a big scoop, but did not want to offend his Democratic sources too much by making it too prominent.)
- 7:59 AM, 24 February 2015   [link]


If You Missed The Oscars Program, you missed at least one pretty good joke.   (There may have been others, but that's the only one I've heard of.)

The target of the joke thinks it was funny; his co-conspirator doesn't.  I think in this instance we can believe Glenn Greenwald, and I think we never know whether to believe Edward Snowden, unless we have solid evidence from other sources..
- 3:29 PM, 23 February 2015   [link]


How Well Is Obama's Opening To Cuba Working Out?   Not very.
For all the high expectations, and deep anxieties, that surround the U.S.-Cuba thaw that President Obama announced two months ago, the reality is that the process is still in its very early days.   The two countries have not agreed even on one of the simpler bilateral issues: opening full-fledged embassies in each other’s capitals.  Cuban President Raúl Castro sounded an ominous note by hinting that complete normalization might depend on such far-fetched demands as the hand-over of the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay or reparations for the U.S. embargo.

U.S. political leaders would be well advised not to succumb to, or foster, exuberance about the transformation in economic relations that might be at hand — much less about the pending transformation of the Cuban regime.  Official contacts must not sugarcoat or lend undeserved legitimacy to a dynastic dictatorship that remains one of the most repressive on the planet.
Exuberance like that coming from a Democratic congressional delegation to Cuba, led by Nancy Pelosi.

(Pelosi and company stayed at the Saratoga, a very nice hotel, with an instructive history:  It was expropriated by the Castro regime, twice, once in 1959, and again in 2011, after a British company had spent $75 million renovating it.  Two of the executives were jailed for years as part of the 2011 takeover.  If you must sup with the Castro regime, use a very long spoon.

Pelosi and company did not speak to this Cuban woman — but they should have.)
- 6:32 AM, 23 February 2015   [link]


Need Another Reason To Dislike Cable Companies?  The providers, reacting to fewer viewers, are squeezing in more commercials.  They are even compressing some movies, with odd effects on the voices.
When Stephen Cox was watching “The Wizard of Oz” on TBS last November, something didn’t sound quite right to him about the Munchkins, who are near and dear to his heart.

“Their voices were raised a notch,” said Mr. Cox, the author of several pop- culture books including one about the classic 1939 film.  “It was astounding to me.”

He wasn’t imagining things.  Time Warner Inc. ’s TBS used compression technology to speed up the movie.  The purpose: stuffing in more TV commercials.
Musicians would be most likely to notice these effects, and most likely to be annoyed by them.

Several channels now have more than 20 minutes of commercials per hour.  Of those they list, BET (Black Entertainment Television) is the worst, at 24.2 minutes.

(Full disclosure.  I do not now have cable TV, though I have had it when it came as part of a rent package.  Nor do I have a satellite connection, where you would, I assume, get the same commercials, and the same compression.)
- 5:51 AM, 23 February 2015   [link]


How Do Australian Jihadis Support Themselves?   Welfare, for 96 percent of those who have joined ISIS.

They didn't leave Australia — a nation that has had low unemployment for years — in search of jobs.

(I have no idea what the rules are in Australia, but I wouldn't be surprised to learn that some of the jihadis are breaking them, wouldn't even be surprised to learn that there was an organized effort to subvert their welfare system.  The article that Tim Blair linked to gives some evidence that supports both of those conclusions.)
- 5:21 AM, 23 February 2015   [link]


Archives

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November 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3. and Part 4

January 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2012, Part 1, Part 2 Part 3, and Part 4
August 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3and Part 4
December 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2013, , Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4
March 2014, Part 1. Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3. and Part 4






Coming Soon
  • Plan 17 Conservatives
  • FDR and Waterboarding
  • How Long Do Wars Last?
  • Carbon, Carbon Dioxide, and Crescent Wrenches
  • De-Lawyering and Attorney General McKenna


Coming Eventually
  • JFK and Wiretaps
  • Green Republicans
  • The Rise and Fall and Rise of Black Voting
  • Abortion, Cleft Palates, and Europe
  • Kweisi Mfume's Children
  • Public Opinion During Other US Wars
  • Dual Loyalties
  • The Power Index
  • Baby Dancing
  • Jocks, but no Nerds
  • The Four Caliphs




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