Last updated:
8:19 AM, 6 July 2015



Jim Miller on Politics

  Email:
jimxc1 at gmail.com



What's he reading? Francis Parkman.

News Compilers
(Why These?)

A&L Daily
Drudge
egopnews.com
Hot Air
Jewish World Review
Lexis-Nexis
Lucianne
Mediaite
memeorandum
Monsters and Critics
*newser
Orbusmax
Rantburg
Real Clear Politics
SciTech Daily
Yahoo


Big Media
(Why These?)

Atlantic Monthly
BBC
CNN
Chosen Ilbo
*Daily Mail (UK)
*Deutsche Welle
Fox News
Globe and Mail (CA)
Guardian (UK)
Investor's Business Daily
Le Figaro (FR)
Le Monde (FR)
The Local (Sweden)
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Der Spiegel
Telegraph (UK)
Times (UK)
El Universal
U. S. News
USA Today
Wall Street Journal
Washington Examiner
Washington Post
Washington Times


References:

Adherents
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Census Quick Facts
Dave Leip's Election Atlas
FactCheck
Federal Statistics
How Stuff Works
NationMaster
Refdesk
Snopes
StateMaster
Tax Facts
Unionstats
Wikipedia


Smart Media
(Why These?)

ABC News Note
*The American
The American Spectator
Michael Barone
City Journal
Commentary
Front Page Magazine
Michael Fumento
The Hill
Media Research
Michael Medved
New York Sun
Number Watch
PJ Media
Public Interest
Roll Call
Spinsanity
Townhall
The Weekly Standard


Blogs
(Why These?)

My Group Blog:
Sound Politics

Northwest:


The American Empire
AndrewsDad
Chief Brief
Clear Fog Blog
Coffeemonkey's weblog
Croker Sack
"DANEgerus"
Economic Freedom
Federal Way Conservative
Freedom Foundation
Hairy Thoughts
Huckleberry Online
Andy MacDonald
NW Republican
Orcinus
Public Interest Transportation Forum
<pudge/*>
Northwest Progressive Institute
*Progressive Majority
Matt Rosenberg
Seattle Blogger
Seattle Bubble
Washington Policy Center
West Sound Politics
Zero Base Thinking


Other US:


Ace of Spades HQ
Alien Corn
Ann Althouse
American Thinker
The Anchoress
Armies of Liberation
Art Contrarian
"Baldilocks"
Balloon Juice
Baseball Crank
La Shawn Barber
Beldar
Bleat
Big Government
Bookworm Room
Broadband Politics
Stuart Buck
Keith Burgess-Jackson
*Bush Center
Chef Mojo
Chicago Boyz
Classical Values
*College Insurrection
Confederate Yankee
Jules Crittenden
Daily Pundit
Discriminations
Gregory Djerejian
Daniel W. Drezner
Econlog
Econopundit
Election Law
John Ellis
Engage
Dean Esmay
Gary Farber
Fausta
FiveThirtyEight
Flares into Darkness
Flopping Aces
The Long War Journal
Gateway Pundit
Grasping Reality With Both Hands
Keith Hennessey
Hugh Hewitt
Siflay Hraka
Instapundit
Iowahawk
Joanne Jacobs
Jeff Jarvis
The Jawa Report
Brothers Judd
JustOneMinute
Kausfiles
Kesher Talk
Le-gal In-sur-rec-tion
Little Green Footballs
Megan McArdle
Michelle Malkin
Greg Mankiw
Marginal Revolution
Mazurland
Minding the Campus
The ModerateVoice
*The Monkey Cage Mudville Gazette
"neo-neocon"
Betsy Newmark
Newsbusters
No Watermelons Allowed
Ambra Nykola
*The Optimistic Conservative
The Ornery American
OxBlog
Parapundit
"Patterico"
Daniel Pipes
Polipundit
Political Arithmetik
Political Calculations
Pollster.com
Power and Control
Power Line
Protein Wisdom
QandO
Radio Equalizer
RedState
Riehl World View
Right Wing News
Rightwing Nuthouse
Dr. Sanity
Scrappleface
Screw Loose Change
Linda Seebach
Sense of Events
Joshua Sharf
Rand Simberg
Smart Politics
The Spirit of Enterprise
Stability For Our Time
*Strange Maps
The Strata-Sphere
Andrew Sullivan
Don Surber
Sweetness & Light
Taking Hayek Seriously
TalkLeft
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TaxProf
USS Neverdock
VDH's Private Papers
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Villainous Company
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Washington Monthly
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Dr. Weevil
Matt Welch
Winds of Change
Meryl Yourish
zombietime


Canadians:


BlazingCatFur
Colby Cosh
Five Feet of Fury
Kate McMillan
Damian Penny
Bruce Rolston


Latin America:


Babalú
Caracas Chronicles
The Devil's Excrement
Venezuela News and Views


Overseas:


"Franco Aleman"
Bruce Bawer
Biased BBC
Tim Blair
*Andrew Bolt
Peter Briffa
Brussels Journal
*Bunyipitude
Butterflies and Wheels
Crooked Timber
Davids Medienkritik
Egyptian Sand Monkey
EU Referendum
Greenie Watch
Guido Fawkes
Harry's Place
Mick Hartley
Oliver Kamm
JG, Caesarea
*Le Monde Watch
¡No-Pasarán!
Fredrik Norman
Melanie Phillips
John Ray
samizdata
Shark Blog
Natalie Solent
Somtow's World
Bjørn Stærk
Laban Tall
*David Thompson
Michael Yon
This is Zimbabwe

Science Blogs:
The Blackboard
Cliff Mass Weather
Climate Audit
Climate Depot
Climate Science
*Judith Curry
Future Pundit
Gene Expression
The Loom
In The Pipeline
Roger Pielke Jr.
Real Climate
A Voyage To Arcturus
Watts Up With That?

Media Blogs:
Andrew Malcolm
Dori Monson
David Postman
Rhetorical Ammo
Tierney Lab
*White House Dossier

R-Rated:
Horse's A**
Huffington Post

*new



What's Happening To The Chinese Stock Market?  As John D. Rockefeller might say, it has been fluctuating.
But the season’s biggest economic crisis may be occurring in Asia, where shares in China’s two major stock exchanges have nosedived in the past three weeks.  Since June 12, the Shanghai stock exchange has lost 24 percent of its value, while the damage in the southern city of Shenzhen has been even greater at 30 percent.  The tumble has already wiped out more than $2.4 trillion in wealth—a figure roughly 10 times the size of Greece’s economy.
Does this fall reflect a "softening" of the Chinese economy?  Probably, at least in part.
Nevertheless, such volatility in the world’s second largest equity market (by market capitalization) raises questions about the overall health of China’s economy.  GDP grew by 7 percent in the first quarter of 2015, its weakest mark in six years, and stimulus measures adopted by the government have yet to reverse this slide.  According to Ira Kalish, Chief Economist at Deloitte, China’s slowdown has already had consequences beyond its borders.

“Already, the halving of China’s growth has wreaked havoc with global commodity markets and has negatively influenced growth in those East Asian economies that are a vital part of China’s manufacturing supply chain,” he wrote in ChinaFile.   “It could be argued that the imbalances in China’s economy thus represent more of a risk to the global economy than the current and much discussed situation in Greece.”
Although this decline has been slower, it reminds me of 1987's "Black Monday".
In finance, Black Monday refers to Monday, October 19, 1987, when stock markets around the world crashed, shedding a huge value in a very short time.  The crash began in Hong Kong and spread west to Europe, hitting the United States after other markets had already declined by a significant margin.  The Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) dropped by 508 points to 1738.74 (22.61%).[1]  In Australia and New Zealand the 1987 crash is also referred to as Black Tuesday because of the timezone difference.
That crash came when growth was slowing in the United States, as it now appears to be in China, and as problems in the Middle East were heating up.

(Investors, especially active investors, may want to take a look at This Time Is Different, for some historical background.  I haven't read it yet, but have seen good reviews of the book.)
- 8:19 AM, 6 July 2015   [link]


In General, You Don't Do A Person, Or A Nation, A Favor, when you give them a loan that they can't repay.

That simple bit of common sense was lost on those who were pushing sub-prime loans for house buyers here in the United States, and on the European authorities who kept loaning Greece money, even as Greece's debt rose to levels that made it certain that those loans would never be repaid.

Most of those buyers would have been better off if they had not borrowed money for homes they couldn't afford, and Greece would have been better off without the "rescue" loans from the rest of Europe.

Does that bit of common sense apply to many student loans here in the United States?   Absolutely.
- 7:39 AM, 6 July 2015   [link]


It Will Be "Grexit" Time, Soon:  Greek voters rejected the European Union plan, "decisively".
With almost all the ballots counted, results from the Greek referendum show voters decisively rejecting the terms of an international bailout.

Figures published by the interior ministry showed 61% of those whose ballots had been counted voting "No", against 39% voting "Yes".

Greece's governing Syriza party had campaigned for a "No", saying the bailout terms were humiliating.
Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras says that this will let him go back to the bargaining table, with a stronger hand.

However, the blunt fact is that Greece will never repay most of its debts to the lenders, and it would be better to admit that sooner, with a formal bankruptcy, than to keep these negotiations going with all the pain they cause Greeks, and all the ill will they cause on both sides.

Greece already defaulted once, in 2012.
But sometimes people have good reason to act a bit crazy.  In 2009, Greece was running a budget deficit of more than 15 percent of annual spending, and investors were getting nervous.  They wondered if Greece could make payments on its debt, then totaling about 130 percent of its national output—compared with about 75 percent for Britain, 54 percent for America, 61 percent for France, and 44 percent for Germany—and continue to provide public services.  Investors cut Greece off, and the IMF, the European Commission, and the European Central Bank stepped in to provide Greece with €110 billion in return for spending cuts, tax hikes, and asset sales.  The bailout didn’t work, and Greece’s economy continued to spiral down; Europe doubled its lending in 2012.

Lost in all of the talk about Greece’s possible default is that the country defaulted once before.  In 2012, Greece used money from European governments to pay its private-sector creditors about half what it owed them.  Was that a bailout of private creditors?  The private creditors sure thought so—they happily took the deal.   But Greece evidently didn’t default enough, since the rest of Europe felt the cure for Greece’s debts to private creditors was an even greater amount of debt to foreign governments.
I dislike Tsipras and company, but I would have voted no, because I think that a no vote is more likely to force a quick bankruptcy, which is what Greece — and the European Union — need.

(To see just how messed up Greece is economically, take a look at these five charts.

Some news folks are expressing surprise at the vote, but when I glanced at the polls this morning, I noticed that the no side had won 23, the yes side, 6.  Moreover, the yes wins were all by small margins, from 0,4 to 3.0, while the no wins ranged from 1.0 to 32.0.)

- 5:32 PM, 6 July 2015   [link]


Violinist Jenny Oaks Baker Plays "Amazing Grace", accompanied by by Condoleezza Rice on the piano.

It's a lovely version.  Those who know the words will want to sing along; others may want to look up the words before the song begins.

(Alas, I have to mention that the cause that this version is supporting, Wounded Warriors, has received sharp, and, as far as I know, justified criticism for its high overhead.  So you may want to investigate before you buy the song.  Or not; it isn't a lot of money.)
- 4:54 PM, 5 July 2015   [link]


Happy 4th Of July!  And thank you to those who make it possible.

Veterans of Foreign Wars at Kirkland 4th of July, 2015

The picture is from this year's Kirkland 4th of July parade, which traditionally (and appropriately) begins with a veterans group.
- 4:25 PM, 4 July 2015   [link]


"Independence Day Links"  The National Review has them, enough to satisfy most Americans.
- 9:48 AM, 4 July 2015   [link]


How's That Opening To Cuba Working Out?  Not very well, for ordinary Cubans.
In announcing the reopening of the U.S. embassy in Havana, President Obama said “nobody expects Cuba to be transformed overnight” by his policy of “engagement.”  That’s just as well because in the first six months of Mr. Obama’s normalization of relations with the Communist regime, most indicators of human rights on the island have moved in the wrong direction.
Not coincidentally, in my opinion.

The next-to-the-last sentence in the Washington Post editorial begins with: "We'd like to hope . . . ".  Which, of course, is one of those things you say when you have given up hope, in this case for an Obama policy toward Cuba that shows even a little respect for human rights in Cuba.
- 2:29 PM, 3 July 2015   [link]


Lanny Davis's Harsh Criticism Of Hillary Clinton:  Which he meant as a compliment.
Clinton ally and political strategist Lanny Davis argued on Fox Business Network that Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton has never changed her position on any issue throughout her entire career.

“Is she going further left because of that, because of [Democratic candidate Bernie Sanders] resonating?” FBN’s Dagen McDowell asked.

“She hasn’t changed a single position in her entire career, she has been a progressive Democrat.  So I don’t know what you mean by going left.  Name me the issue she went left on,”Davis said.
Alex Griswold then gives a little list of issues on which she has changed her position.

But I think that Lanny Davis is more right than wrong; Hillary Clinton has adopted different positions from time to time for tactical, political reasons, but I can't think of any issues where she has changed her mind because she has learned something since she graduated from Wellesley in 1969.

For all her intelligence, she is unable, or unwilling, to learn from experiences, hers or others.

And that should frighten anyone who thinks she might be our next president.
- 2:04 PM, 3 July 2015   [link]


"Country Music Finds A Home Far From Home, In Kenya"   Every once in a while, you run across a headline that makes you do a double take.

For example, that one.

But the New York Times article makes it less surprising, perhaps even inevitable.
Sir Elvis, dressed in a yellow and black plaid shirt, jeans, boots and a black cowboy hat, tuned his guitar under the wooden roof and neon beer advertisements of the Reminisce Bar and Restaurant. With a signal to the band, he began singing the Don Williams country hit “It Must Be Love” in a purring baritone.  Patrons got up to dance, rocking back and forth.

This would not be an unusual sight for Nashville or just about any country tavern in the United States.  Except this was not East Texas, but Nairobi in East Africa, where American country music has a surprisingly robust, and growing, following.

“I grew up with it, and my parents loved country,” said Elvis Otieno, 37, who has become perhaps the best-known Kenyan country performer.  Sir Elvis, as he is known onstage, was born the year Elvis Presley died, and was named after him by parents who were big fans of the King.
That sounds familiar, and this will too, to anyone familiar with country music.
One of the few female country musicians here, Ms. [Esther] Konkara, 27, grew up in a village north of Nairobi and sang gospel in Kikuyu at church.  “We had potatoes, maize, beans, but the only thing we did not have were horses,” she said, comparing her village with the American West.  Ms. Konkara won a scholarship as a teenager to study at a music academy and now performs around the country.

“Just like Dolly Parton sings about her Smoky Mountains, Tennessee, I want to sing about the hills of Kiambu,” she said.
(You can listen to one of her songs, here.  I'm no music critic, but she sounds pretty good to me — and looks good on that horse.)

Many Kenyans are country folks, or just one generation away from the country, and so many of them naturally like country music.  It's that simple.

(Here's Kiambu County, if you are wondering where those hills are.)
- 6:31 PM, 2 July 2015   [link]


Remember Leland Yee, the California Democrat who was charged with everything from gun running to money laundering, to mopery with intent to gawk?   Okay, maybe I made that last one up, but the list of charges was amazing.

He's taken a plea deal.
Closing a dark chapter in California politics and capping the downfall of a prominent Bay Area legislator, former state Sen. Leland Yee on Wednesday pleaded guilty to a federal racketeering charge that is expected to land him in a federal prison cell for at least several years.

The 66-year-old Yee cut a plea deal with federal prosecutors, avoiding a looming August trial date but forcing him to admit he took payments in return for promises to use his political clout for a host of powerful interests, from NFL owners to medical marijuana businesses.   Dressed in a dark suit and calm enough to chat casually with reporters before entering his guilty plea, Yee confessed in his plea agreement that he used his bids for secretary of state and San Francisco mayor as racketeering enterprises to extort bribes for his cash-starved campaigns.
Unfortunately:
Yee's plea deal avoids a detailed exploration at trial of his political dealings, and could be used to coax some leniency from the judge.  But it also spares the government an attack on its sprawling four-year covert investigation, which included FBI undercover agents doling out bags of cash and countless hours of audio and video recordings, including some that crossed paths with numerous high-profile figures who were not implicated in any wrongdoing, including former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Joe Montana and San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee.
That should make you wonder whether some of those "high-profile figures" might have crossed some ethical lines, if not necessarily legal lines.

In 2014, I argued that four very high-profile had good opportunities to know about Lee's illegal dealings.  For instance, I noted that the districts represented by Lee and Nancy Pelosi have overlapped, considerably.

And California journalists could have known about some of his illegal activities, if they had only bothered to do routine checks.   Instead, they gave him good government awards.

Let me say this fairly bluntly:  Few of our "mainstream" journalists are interested in investigating minority Democrats who hold leftist positions on important issues, as Yee did.

By way of Jazz Shaw who, like me, thinks that Yee's (alleged) co-conspirator, Raymond “Shrimp Boy” Chow, has a great nickname for a gangster.
- 2:08 PM, 2 July 2015   [link]


But Is It A Good E-Reader?  This morning, inspired by a review in the Wall Street Journal, I spent many minutes trying to get a Kindle Paperwhite to show me a book, or even a block of text.  But the display model at a local Staples store baffled me — or perhaps it wasn't set up to demonstrate its principal use.

That failure seemed so perverse that I began to wonder whether Amazon was sending out models to stores that were deliberately crippled, in order to encourage you to buy directly from them.  Almost certainly not, but it did seem odd that they wouldn't show blocks of text first, since they are boasting about the readability of the new models, which even have their own brand-new typeface, Bookerly.

(There are four new models, with and without 3G, which allows you to download books through a cellphone network, and with and without ads.  3G adds $60 to the cost; without ads adds 20 dollars, which gives you an idea how valuable those ads are to Amazon.)

In the past, I would have, fairly automatically, looked for an alternative product from a competitor that was not becoming a monopoly.  But sometimes you have to admit that a monopoly has won, and I fear that may be true in e-readers.

Of course a tablet would be an alternative, and there are many of those now, some quite reasonably priced.
- 12:39 PM, 2 July 2015   [link]


Are Journalists Conspiring With Hillary Clinton?  The Washington Examiner finds two possibilities in those Clinton emails.  One, BuzzFeed editor-in-chief Ben Smith, makes a plausible case for his innocence; the other, Leslie Gelb, looks guilty.
The Pulitzer Prize winner appeared in 2009 to be quite interested in writing the former first lady a flattering profile, according to an email written by longtime Clinton ally Lynn Forester de Rothschild.

"I spent yesterday with Les Gelb on Nantucket.  He had lots to say which might be of interest, but I thought the most important thing to tell you is to make sure you are aware of the Parade magazine piece he wants to do about you," she wrote in an email addressed to the now-Democratic presidential candidate.  "He would like to do a day in your life, when you meet with members of Congress and international figures.  He wants to show the impact you are having domestically and internationally."

She added in a passage that reflected poorly on Gelb, "He said he would give you a veto over content and looked me in the eye and said, 'she will like it.'  Maybe you know this, but did not want it to fall between the cracks.  Enjoy your vacation and love to all of you."
Gelb "did not respond to the Examiner's request for comment".

Parade magazine routinely runs flattering pieces on prominent people, so flattering that I usually don't bother to read them, since I'm sure they are leaving out much of interest.

But, if Gelb did make those offers, then he was, essentially, offering to conspire with Clinton to make sure that the usual Parade puff piece had everything in it she wanted.

(There's nothing new about this kind of conspiracy; Don Hewitt conspired with Bill and Hillary Clinton to paint a false picture in a 60 Minutes program, a program that may have saved the Clinton campaign in 1992.

But you won't see that in his Wikipedia biography, which should remind us, once again, to be cautious about relying on Wikipedia political articles.)
- 7:45 AM, 2 July 2015   [link]


Archives

June 2002
July 2002
August 2002
September 2002
October 2002, Part 1 and Part 2
November 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
December 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3

January 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
February 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
March 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
April 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2004, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2004, Part 1, Part 2. Part 3, and Part 4
October 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2005, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2006, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2007, Part 1 and Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2007, Part 1 Part 2, and Part 3, and Part 4
June 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2008, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4
May 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3. and Part 4

January 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2012, Part 1, Part 2 Part 3, and Part 4
August 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3and Part 4
December 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2013, , Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4
March 2014, Part 1. Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2015, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2015, Part 1






Coming Soon
  • Plan 17 Conservatives
  • FDR and Waterboarding
  • How Long Do Wars Last?
  • Carbon, Carbon Dioxide, and Crescent Wrenches
  • De-Lawyering and Attorney General McKenna


Coming Eventually
  • JFK and Wiretaps
  • Green Republicans
  • The Rise and Fall and Rise of Black Voting
  • Abortion, Cleft Palates, and Europe
  • Kweisi Mfume's Children
  • Public Opinion During Other US Wars
  • Dual Loyalties
  • The Power Index
  • Baby Dancing
  • Jocks, but no Nerds
  • The Four Caliphs




Best Posts


Books


Strange Obama


The Unknown Bush


University Reform


Uncorrected Mistakes


Vote Fraud


The Gang of Four


Articles


Assignment Desk
(What's This?)


Columns


Common Mistakes
(What's This?)


Chomsky Cult Program


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